Tanzania Episcopal Conference has partnered with Gareth Barry Zimbabwean expert in dairy farming  as the organisation seek to remodel its dairy project.

Director of Finance and Administration of Tanzania Episcopal Conference Eric Mwelulila said “Zimbabwe’s experience in dairy farming was more forthcoming and kind to accord the organisation with all the information”.

“Barry has been constantly sharing information, teaching us and empowering the community in Manicaland (Zimbabwe) to expand the dairy farming knowledge and helping us to develop this idea,” said Mwelulila.

In addition, the Tanzanian organisation has entered into a strategic partnership with a Zimbabwean organisation, Sinapis Investment Holdings.

Tanzania Episcopal Conference runs a dairy farm in the Dakawa District in Morogoro.

Mwelulila said the benefits of partnering with Sinapis were to tap into Zimbabwe’s advanced dairy farming expertise and skills.

“Tanzania is a very young developing country. We are not yet advanced, we are still a very young dairy industry country.

So, we will be able to create value addition for the industry in Tanzania and the community will be able to grow the industry and create more dairy products and it is also an opportunity for Zimbabwe to trade more with Tanzania in the dairy industry,” said Mwelulila.

Augustine Banga, Sinapis, Commercial Managerlauded the partnership, and said the Tanzanian organisation, which is milking 112 cows currently, wants to build its dairy milking herd to 150 and by implementing technical skills and advice as well as acquiring some of Mr Barry’s dairy breed with the hope of  increasing its daily yield.

Banga said: “We are going to partner and look for the right genetics and management side. Sinapis is going to provide the technical side and also the management side of the joint venture.

The model is going to be replicated in various parts of Tanzania.

Meanwhile Mwelulila said the organisation would definitely acquire dairy cows from Barry’s farm after being inspired by his own breed that he had introduced to small- scale rural farmers.

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